Fly Tying Class to be held

The Susquehanna Chapter of Trout Unlimited will hold fly tying classes for six weeks on Tuesday evenings starting on February 10 to March 17 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the social hall of the First Presbyterian Church, 102 E. 3rd Street in Williamsport.  There will be no cost for the course and it is open to the public. The Chapter will supply all the tools and materials needed but you are welcome to bring your own if you have them. There will be introductory and more advanced classes with many of those sessions accommodating particular interests of the participants. If you would like to tie a particular fly, please let us now so that the instructors can prepare and to make sure we have the materials needed.  Instructors will include experienced tiers from our area.  Youth 10 years and older are welcomed (under 15 yrs should be accompanied by an adult).

Anyone interested may register by sending an email to the Chapter at susquehannatu@gmail.com, or calling Bob Baker at (570) 337-1279. If there is no answer, please leave your name, address, phone number / email address and if you will be in the beginner class or more advanced.

Tell the PA Fish and Boat Commission to protect our Class A Wild Trout Streams

The PA Fish and Boat Commission will be having their quarterly meeting on January 21, 2015. One of the topics up for discussion is the stocking of Class A streams.   The following is taken from the PA Council of Trout Unlimited’s website.

At the September, 2014 Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) meeting, the Board of Commissioners voted to allow stocking of Class A wild trout streams. The policy change, documented at http://fishandboat.com/rulemakings/255finp.pdf, allows the Executive Director, with approval from the Board of Commissioners, to designate Class A streams for stocking.

This is a major change to what was originally proposed to the Commission, which PATU did not oppose, that would have allowed some stocking in Class A sections where:

  1. Angler use meets or exceeds the 75th percentile (number of anglers/ mile on Opening Day)
  2. The water had been stocked the year preceding the Class A designation
  3. The stream does not contain a wild brook trout population or the trout species to be stocked are not the same species as the primary component of the wild trout population.
  4. The stream was not identified as Class A prior to 2013.
  5. After review of the above data, stocking could be approved by the Board of Commissioners and the Executive Director.

However, in its final consideration, the Board of Commissioners voted to remove all of the above criteria except the approval by the Commissioners and Executive Director (Statement of Policy 57.8a). Essentially, this change could allow for any Class A stream across the state to be stocked if approved by Board of Commissioners and the Executive Director.

Class A streams are considered some of the best and most pristine waters in Pennsylvania, and provide a wonderful recreational opportunity for all anglers. We believe that this amended policy leaves the door open for the PFBC to stock Class A streams across the state. Please take a few minutes to provide comment to the PFBC and ask them to please consider including the originally proposed criteria into policy 57.8a, so that our Class A streams can remain the pristine waters they are today. See below for how you can submit comments.

To provide input to Statement of Policy 57.8a, please submit comments in writing to Executive Director, Fish and Boat Commission, P.O. Box 57000, Harrisburg, PA 17106-7000, or electronically by completing the form at www.fishandboat.com/regcomments. If an acknowledgment of electronic comments is not received by the sender within 2 working days, the comments should be retransmitted to ensure receipt. Electronic comments submitted in any other manner will not be accepted. 

HAPPY NEW YEAR

Happy-New-Year-2015-With-Flowers-hd-wallpaper

Everyone at the Susquehanna Chapter of Trout Unlimited wishes you and your families a very happy and safe New Year.  We want to thank all of you for your support and to let you know that our success is not possible without each and everyone of you.  We are looking forward to the future and in starting new friendships and ventures and want all of you to be part of our future.

Happy Holiday Season

     The Susquehanna Chapter of Trout Unlimited would like to wish all of you a very Happy and Safe Holiday Season and a great New Year.  This is a time to spend with family and friends and to give thanks for everything that you do have.  Everyone associated with the Chapter is part of our family and we want nothing but the happiest and best for each and everyone of you.

     Our good friend, Don Bastian had a post on his website (http://donbastianwetflies.com/) on December 24, 2013 and we wanted to share it with you.  It is being copied with Don’s permission.  Hope you enjoy it.

Rudolph the Red-nosed Reintrout

rudolph-trout

Of course, the music in me and my imagination has got me instantly wanting to put this card to music, so to the tune of Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer, please sing along:

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reintrout

By Don Bastian, adapted from original lyrics by Johnny Marks, 1939

You know Beadhead and Humpy and Slumpbuster and Fishy,

Finny and Wet Fly and Slimy and Squishy,

But do you recall, the most famous reintrout of all?

Rudolph the red-nosed reintrout, had a very shiny snout –

And if you ever hooked him, he would jump and leap about!

All of the other reintrout, used to laugh and call him names,

They never let poor Rudolph, join in any reintrout games.

Then one muddy water Fishmas Eve, Sunfish came to say,

Rudolph with your snout so bright, won’t you lead my trout tonight?

Then all the reintrout loved him, and they shouted out with glee,

Rudolph the red-nosed reintrout, we’ll be swimming easily!

Merry Christmas everybody!

Rock Run Watershed Assessment Proposal Topic of November 12 Meeting

Shawn Rummell, Field and Research Coordinator of Trout Unlimited’s Eastern Abandoned Mine Project will be the featured speaker on Wednesday Nov. 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the monthly meeting of Susquehanna Chapter, TU in the Fellowship Hall of First Presbyterian Church, E. 3rd and Mulberry Sts., Williamsport.  Rock Run, tributary of Lycoming Creek at Ralston, is well known as one of the most scenic mountain streams in PA as well as a favorite and historic trout stream. However, legacy coal mining, acid rain deposition, acidic headwaters bogs, and geology lacking in acid buffering capacity have compromised the watershed’s ability to be a productive trout fishery.

Dr. Rummell will present information describing how TU’s Eastern Abandoned Mine Project can facilitate the process of obtaining a grant to perform a technical assessment of the Rock Run watershed to determine water quality issues and opportunities to remediate and improve the watershed’s aquatic and fishery resources.

All members are encouraged to attend to hear how our chapter can assist and participate in laying the groundwork for potential projects to improve this incredibly important and beautiful natural area.

 

Representative Everett to Speak

The Consolidated Sportsmen of Muncy Creeks are pleased to welcome Representative Garth Everett of Pennsylvania’s 87th  legislative district to its monthly club meeting on November 5, 2015, at 7:00 PM. The meeting will take place at the Hughesville Volunteer Fire Company located at Railroad and Water Streets in Hughesville.

The event is open to interested sportsmen and the public.  Representative Everett will discuss issues related to sportsmen in Lycoming County.

The Sportsmen, a totally volunteer organization, meet on the first Wednesday of every month at the Hughesville Volunteer Fire Department.  For more information, visit muncycreeks.org.

 

Tell your state Senator to vote NO on PA House Bill HB1565

We all know the value of maintaining appropriate riparian buffers, especially as they affect the quality of our coldwater streams. As currently proposed, HB1565 would substantially alter the existing protection afforded by riparian buffers by allowing their elimination on those streams designated as special protection waters.

HB1565 proposes a “trade off” in the form of an option allowing the elimination of riparian buffers in one portion of a stream as long as an equivalent section is provided for in another section of that same watershed. What this means is that development along headwaters sections of our coldwater streams could eliminate riparian buffers on those waters which are so critical to sustaining a wild trout population.

PA House passes HB1565  by a 119 – 79 vote – Now it is up to the Senate to Protect Pennsylvania’s Water Resources

On 9/22/14, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives passed House Bill 1565, rolling back regulations that require riparian buffers to be maintained or created and instead making buffers an optional best management practice.  Now, the bill is the Senate for consideration.  With a handful of days left in the legislative session, anything is possible.  Please make your voice heard and contact your state Senator.

Tell your Senator to Protect Pennsylvania’s Water Resources and to Vote NO on House Bill 1565

Here is a link to the Pa. Senate site, which can help you find your senator:

http://www.pasen.gov/index.cfm

 We need you take action TODAY to protect Pennsylvania’s trout streams.

Here is why HB1565 doesn’t make sense:

  • Riparian buffer zones of native vegetation are the most effective tool-in terms of management and cost-to prevent accelerated erosion and sedimentation, protect water quality through filtering pollution, reduce the severity of flooding, and provide important habitat for wildlife.
  • Weakening the existing regulatory requirements would have a negative impact on water quality, communities who rely on buffers to slow flood waters, and fish and wildlife habitat. 
  • As amended, HB1565 would allow a project to destroy riparian buffers in one part of the watershed, and build new buffers elsewhere in the watershed.  Unfortunately, this amendment doesn’t factor into account the site-specific benefits that buffers provide-leaving the stream where the buffer was removed without the pollution filtering, shade and flood control capabilities.
  • Sedimentation continues to be one of the greatest sources of pollution to Pennsylvania’s streams.  Riparian buffers are critical for intercepting precipitation, and slowing the flow of runoff into stream channels-ultimately reducing the erosive forces acting on the stream bed and banks.  And the root systems of native plants help to stabilize stream banks, thereby reducing bank erosion.  Less erosion also means less sediment deposited in the stream channel downstream, when the current slows.

Please contact your Senator today, and tell him or her that House Bill 1565 is bad for Pennsylvania’s sportsmen and women, bad for communities and property owners, and it will remove important protections for the commonwealth’s fish and wildlife.

Project Healing Waters

Project-Healing-Waters

At the September Chapter meeting, a vote was taken to enter into an agreement with Project Healing Waters. This agreement allows for the Chapter to work with the local Veterans Administration to hold a program in this area.

The local VA is excited about this venture and will support the Chapter in any way needed.  On Sunday September 30 at 8 am, Fox & Friends Weekend will have a story on the New York City program.  This will be a great opportunity to become familiar with this program and hope you are able to watch.

Our Chapter has agreed to have 2 fly tying classes a month and to provide a minimum of 2 instructors at each class. After some flies have been tied, we will be getting out and doing fly casting instruction.  Sometime down the road, we will hopefully be able to do some fly fishing.

We are still in the very early stages of this program and a lot of work lies ahead.  We have only had 5 people commit to helping with the program and we can use help.

We can use you no matter if you tie flies or your skill in fly fishing. There will be something to do at all events so please consider helping these great men and women who have given so much of themselves for us.

This is not only a great opportunity for the Chapter, but also for the Veterans in our area.

Donald Neyhart

2014-09-18 Don Neyhart2

Great sadness has again fell upon the Chapter. Longtime member Don Neyhart passed away on Wednesday September 17.  I was able to meet Don two years ago and spent several hours with him.  We talked about many things during the time I spent with him but the topic always came back to fishing.  He loved everything about fishing and all types of fishing.  Don realized at that time that he would not be able to continue fishing and donated his entire collection (several thousand dollars worth) to the Chapter.

Don donated over 30 fishing rods of every imaginable type, a large collection of fly tying materials and flies, lure making equipment, a very large assortment of hooks, lures, weights, tackle box’s, and assorted other accessories. His generosity was, and still is, greatly appreciated and has sparked others to donate to the Chapter although no collection as large as Don’s.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to Don’s entire family and friends

Don’s obituary as it appears on the Sanders Mortuary website is given below (http://www.sandersmortuary.com/obits/obituary.php?id=497964)

Donald J. Neyhart, 88, of Williamsport, died Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, at Valley View Nursing Center.      Born Dec. 17, 1925, in Lock Haven, he was a son of Albert and Elizabeth (Burkholder) Neyhart. Donald married his high school sweetheart on May 22, 1949, Marguerite E. (Fowler) Neyhart.      Don was a member of Lycoming Presbyterian Church. He was a 1944 graduate of Williamsport Area High School and attended Williamsport Technical Institute. Don graduated from Bliss Institute of Washington, D.C., majoring in electrician in 1946, American University Business Management in 1971, and Whirlpool Corporation Management and Service School.      He was an Army Veteran of World War II. Following his military service he was employed with Sylvania Electric and Westinghouse Electric for five years. He was the owner and operator of Don Neyhart’s TV and Appliance Center for 24 years and P.E.N. Video Rental for 5 years. He was a member of the Williamsport Consistory, Ivy Blue Lodge F & AM, Zafar Grotto and Travelers Protective Association.      He enjoyed hunting, fishing, and gardening. His dream was always to retire and do more fishing.      Surviving in addition to his wife Peggy are his daughters, Rebecca D. (Jeffery) Huff, of Trout Run and Lucinda S. (Joseph) Andruscavage, of Red Lion; grandchildren, Joshua T. Huff, Samuel T. (Jennifer) Huff, Patrick Cooper and Ashley Cooper; great-grandchildren, Deegan, Darenger, Audria, Ryder, Piper, Max and Joseph; brothers, Albert E., Paul L. and Laurence J. Neyhart; and sister, Elizabeth A. Jackson.      In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by a brother, Richard D. Neyhart, and sisters, Roberta Bennett and Eleanor Frank.      Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 22 at Sanders Mortuary, 821 Diamond St., Williamsport, with the Rev. Dr. Larry A. LeFeber officiating. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. until the time of service. Burial will follow in Montoursville Cemetery.      Memorial contributions may be made in Donald’s name to the American Heart Association, 968 Postal Road, Suite 110, Allentown, PA 18109.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell your Representative to VOTE NO on House Bill 1565

 

The following is from an email sent out by the Pennsylvania Council of Trout Unlimited

Dear Pennsylvania TU Member,

House Bill 1565-a bill that would remove the currently required riparian buffer requirements for special protection waters-was voted out of the Environmental Resources & Energy committee  on Monday, September 15,  and is awaiting a vote on the House floor in the very near future.   

We need you take action TODAY to protect Pennsylvania’s trout streams.

Here is why HB1565 doesn’t make sense:

  • Riparian buffer zones of native vegetation are the most effective tool-in terms of management and cost-to prevent accelerated erosion and sedimentation, protect water quality through filtering pollution, reduce the severity of flooding, and provide important habitat for wildlife.
  • Weakening the existing regulatory requirements would have a negative impact on water quality, communities who rely on buffers to slow flood waters, and fish and wildlife habitat. 
  • As amended, HB1565 would allow a project to destroy riparian buffers in one part of the watershed, and build new buffers elsewhere in the watershed.  Unfortunately, this amendment doesn’t factor into account the site-specific benefits that buffers provide-leaving the stream where the buffer was removed without the pollution filtering, shade and flood control capabilities.
  • Sedimentation continues to be one of the greatest sources of pollution to Pennsylvania’s streams.  Riparian buffers are critical for intercepting precipitation, and slowing the flow of runoff into stream channels-ultimately reducing the erosive forces acting on the stream bed and banks.  And the root systems of native plants help to stabilize stream banks, thereby reducing bank erosion.  Less erosion also means less sediment deposited in the stream channel downstream, when the current slows.

Please contact your Representative today, and tell him or her that House Bill 1565 is bad for Pennsylvania’s sportsmen and women, bad for communities and property owners, and it will remove important protections for the commonwealth’s fish and wildlife.

Find your legislator

 To learn more about why House Bill 1565 is a bad idea for Pennsylvania, please check out the PATU website.

Thank you for all you do to protect wild and native trout,

Brian Wagner
President, Pennsylvania Council of Trout Unlimited

Kay Dunlap
Eastern Water Project Director
Trout Unlimited